Category Archives: Works in Progress

Destinazione: Italia!

On the Adriatic, my grandfather and crew sailing his boat, the Luisa V.

Next week I’ll be setting my feet down for the first time in Vasto, Italy, the hometown of my grandfather. It’s located on the Adriatic coast, in the Abruzzo region.  Having heard about Vasto my whole life, it’s always been on my list of places to visit “someday” but thanks in part to my daughter studying art in Greece and Italy this spring, the time is now! Soon I’ll be traveling with a friend to Rome, Naples, Sorrento and the Amalfi Coast before joining Sophia in Florence at the end of her school term.

How This Came About- The Sea Glass Connection

 

Full circle-from Vasto to the Pacific NW and soon back to Italy,

Through the sea glass world, I met Ornella di Filippo, who makes beautiful wire-wrapped jewelry and ornaments from the glass she finds on Italian beaches. And… she happens to live in Vasto.  I had questions about my family’s ancestral town, and Ornella was most kind and helpful. After sharing a few photos from my grandfather’s album, she was able to locate the home where he once lived and places related to my family history, including graves.

After learning so much from her, It was easy to put Vasto at the top of the list, and go from there to other, more known destinations.

We will stay in Vasto for three nights and soak up the local seafood and sights. Ornella will give us a personalized tour of Vasto and also serve as our sea glass guide, and I feel so fortunate!

 

Vasto sea glass ring

Countdown

As the trip gets closer, I am inspired to make some pieces of jewelry with Italian roots to photograph on location at ancient sites like Paestum, Pompeii, and Herculaneum.  Currently I’m making some rings with ancient coins that I’ve been saving for just the right project.

Larrissa, ancient Greek silver coin c 356-342 B.C. with old Mediterranean coral.

While near Pompeii, we will meet another person from the sea glass world, Rebecca Di Donna. She has already been helpful in pinpointing places a glasser would not want to miss. I can hardly wait to visit the museum of coral located in her hometown, along with the fantastic natural beauty of Capri and the Amalfi Coast. And let’s not get started on Firenze!

There’s going to be a lot to share, and until my next blog, please follow my Instagram feed https://www.instagram.com/judithaltrudajewelry

Till then,

Ciao Bella!

 

Into the Wild

aldar eye

Right now, the signs of Fall are everywhere in the  Pacific Northwest. Lately I have been lucky enough to spend a lot of time in the woods, witnessing the changes of the season. And extra lucky to have as a forest companion an 84 year old man who has spent his life working in the woods. His name is Marv Jones. His son, Bruce, who has been taking us on weekly excursions into the wild, compares his father to the original Jeremiah Johnson.

Marv reads the forest both as a living journal of current events and history book. For example, the faintest scratch along a logging road tells him a good sized buck deer was here, the direction it was headed and how long ago. Once a professional bear hunter for the State, he points to Cascara trees with bent branches, a sure sign that bear were here eating berries within the last day or two. He explains to me why one tree is left standing in a clear cut, (as a seed tree) and  recalls planting trees in the 1960s for a timber company, using tree planting machines (that were later discarded because humans do it better.) He shows me  where the timber camp was located. It’s hard to imagine that buildings once stood here, the only marker now is a tree stump with a rusty bucket perched on top.

He gives me a bear tooth for a good luck piece, which I now carry in my pocket.

Marv, photo by Bruce Jones

Marv, photo by Bruce Jones

An avid photographer, he has a keen eye for the beauty of dew coated  spider webs shinning in the sunlight or mushrooms freshly popped up from the forest floor. Speaking of fungi, the first rains of the season have spurred overnight mushroom growth.  I think about the campy Japanese horror film MatangoAttack of the Mushroom People, as I encounter mushrooms of incredible size and colors.

matango

We pick chanterelles, a highly prized seasonal mushroom by the bucket fulls…

chantrelle mushroom

chanterelle mushroom

What follows are some photographic highlights from these “sashays”, as Marv would say…

Bear claw marks

Bear claw marks

Elk graffiti-marks left on tree from where elk polished his horns

Elk graffiti-marks left on tree from where elk polished his horns

mushroom

fungi

fungi

The forest provides an inspirational photographic setting for jewelry…after years of shooting on the beach I am excited by the filtered light and moodiness of the woods.

men's copper cuff

men’s copper cuff

musroom rings 2

Mist Ring on alder leaf

Mist Ring on alder leaf

copper cuff and lycopodium moss

copper cuff and lycopodium moss

 

cuffa and mushrooms

so many mushrooms, so little time!

labrynth and mushrrom

 

black beach stone ring and maple leaf

black beach stone ring and maple leaf

After several  weekends spent tromping through the woods, I dive back into the studio with fresh ideas that practically explode off the bench!

And speaking of new work...I will be showing at the fabulous Santa Cruz Sea Glass Festival   November 7 and 8th. To see more new work , I invite you to follow me on Instagram

in progress on the bench

in progress on the bench

sea glass and eel grass

sea glass and eel grass

I have to thank Bruce and his father Marv for giving me a real insider’s tour of the forest that I have lived so close to and yet never really known before. I hope to share more photos in future posts with you.

October sunrise by Marv Jones

October sunrise by Marv Jones

In closing, hope you are having a terrific Autumn, and taking some time to enjoy the changing of the season.

 

 

You Are Here

timbers mermaid Copper etching of Timber’s Mermaid

I am writing this post on the Lunar New Year-goat or sheep-take your pick. (I choose goat.)

Here in the Northern Hemisphere we are at a seasonal crossroads. The last weeks of winter linger, while the days grow longer and warmer.

Everywhere signs of Spring are emerging: the sounds of frog choruses at night, cherry blossoms in bud, robins singing in the early morning. The sap is moving in the trees and I feel a corresponding awakening within.  Winter’s sequestration is nearly over and it feels good to be outside again!

Something I do when the weather is good and the garage doors can stay open is etching metal (copper and shibuichi) in acid baths. The drawings of five year old Timber, daughter of Jeffro and Zela, were among my first projects.

In less than a month I will be in  California for the Cayucos Sea Glass Festival, where the theme is mermaids. Timber’s drawings will translate into great display pieces for my booth.

Here is a sneak peak at what I will be showing there:

caycous ringblue

scott2

After a long period of grey skies and heavy rain, when the sun comes out its a call to action for beach photo shoots!

Like the changing seasons I have been developing two lines of work-one sunny and bright (the sea glass) and the other deeper and more mysterious. This has been my Winter’s endeavor. Time consuming, skill challenging, pushing my vision further. It is only the beginning, but I share it here with you:

Bacchanal Rings~

dionysus coinphoto by Marcy Merrill

Dionysos ancient Greek coin (3rd Century B.C. ) with 22kt gold, ruby, reticulated silver and 18kt hand formed band.

beecoin 2

Honey Bee coin, Ionia c. 305-288 B.C. with 22kt and 18kt gold, reticulated silver and yellow diamond. Photo by Marcy Merrill

stagphoto by Marcy Merrill

Artemis-Greek coin from the 2nd-1st Century B.C. featuring stag. 22KT,18KT gold,reticulated silver.

octo coinNymph- ancient Sicilian coin with octopus on reverse side, 22KT and 18KT gold, reticulated silver, diamonds. Photo by Marcy Merrill

In closing, I would like to share two  photos taken this past week on our beach here in the Center of the Universe!

cathenge

Daybreak-Cat Henge!

tokeland skyine1Sunset, Tokeland Skyline-Sophia and Raleigh

 

scotsunset

Time to get back into the studio-hope to see you at Cayucos!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Celtic Chasing in Ireland

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In August I traveled to Ireland to take a class in Celtic chasing with Brian Clarke. He is a world renowned silversmith who in the past has taught classes all over North America. However nowadays  if you want to take a class with him it requires a trip to his studio in Ballinaclash, Co Wicklow. He teaches 3 one week classes per year, all in the month of August. I felt very lucky to get one of four spaces in the class. I learned about Brian from my friend and teacher Bill Dawson of Mud Bay, WA who has been to Brian’s twice before for classes and study.

IMG_20140808_090353224_HDRBrian’s studio aka The Old School House

I stayed in the nearby  village of Rathdrum. A small town with two butcher shops, seven pubs, (not all currently open) a post office, druggist, small grocery store, two bookie shops, two takeaway shops, (one Chinese, the other fish&chips) two B&B’s, and two Churches on either end of the main drag. Also a beautiful park.

IMG_20140804_072308931_HDR Main Street, RathdrumIMG_20140804_072538315 storefront window display

IMG_20140803_163312254beautiful water main hole covers along the sidewalks!

moores
Moores Family Butcher Shop. I suggested they have t shirts printed with their logo for tourists like me to buy-I got a bemused smile in return….

IMG_20140804_073147758 The Stirabout Inn offered a full Irish breakfast, cooked to order by inn proprietor Daphne. She even picked me up at the train station when I arrived from Dublin. A true home away from home!

Meanwhile, back at the schoolhouse:

We were learning top down chasing-an ancient technique using various metal punches and a hammer to create a dimensional design on the surface of metal. The metal (copper) was stuck into a bowl of warm tree pitch. when the pitch cools it holds the metal firmly as it is hammered.

Two examples of top down chasing by Brian

brians chased design 2

brians chased design

Beginning the first project:

 

IMG_20140804_144602720_HDR The first project was to chase a concentric circle design in copper. First an outline is chased…

IMG_20140806_162247913 Brian positioning a metal punch onto the copper.brain demoanother view

 

heating pitch

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Brian demonstrating heating the pitch (carefully) with a torch until soft, then embedding copper into it. He is using a cold metal tool to apply pressure so no air pockets form beneath the copper( the pitch doesn’t want to stick to cold metal.) The heated pitch has a wonderful pine smell!

We worked steadily, the sound of metal tapping forming a hypnotic rhythm, silenced  only for occasional breaks for biscuits and tea or coffee. The breaks gave our fingers a chance to rest-this is pretty intense stuff. (Pushing through the hours was a good thing-my left thumb went from soreness to numbness after a day or two…) Everyday around 1:00 the class stopped for a lunch at Brian’s house. His beautiful wife Yvonne prepared  delicious meals and joined us at the table for some great conversations.

Back to the studio:

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Brian’s wall of hammers

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tree stump work stations (not for our class)

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My third project, a Celtic knot, in progress measures about 4×4 inches

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To remove the piece, the pitch is heated up again and metal is lifted out. Sometimes a cool design imprint  is left in the pitch, like this one…

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The metal is carefully flattened on a sandbag to even out the edges. It can be remounted into pitch for further refinement or reshaped, patined, or polished as a finished piece.

The “commute”to Rathdrum:

I took this snap from the passenger seat of my classmate’s Porsche-funny to be passing a horse and wagon on the highway!

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Other nearby sightings:

IMG_20140806_181956693_HDR Roadside shrine

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The nearby Wicklow Mountains were once home and hideout to Ireland’s rebel fighters:

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I was taken to the mountains after class one night by Liz and Trevor, friends of friends back home. They pointed out some of the sights along the way as the sun was setting. We had a delicious dinner at the historic Glenmalure Lodge. One of the best sights there was a ninety year old retired sheep farmer named Jim, playing cards with a table of ladies. They used matchsticks to keep score. Apparently he comes there every night!

old jim

 

 

Back to the Schoolhouse:IMG_20140808_143516425

Brian gave a toolmaking demo, using old tool steel an (allyn wrench) to make a liner punch…

 

chasing tool

Two different types of puncheschasing tool 2

Basically punches are used to create lines or texture. Brian said he could get by with seven different punches, however his studio has thousands of them!

Some of our finished projects after five days of class:

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IMG_20140808_170619409 Fellow classmates (minus one) and teacher…

dragon cloud

As I rode the train back to Dublin Friday night, I knew the trip had been worth it in so many ways-too many to put into words right now…Since returning home I have been putting the lessons learned into practice.

Here is a recent piece, chased in silver:

silver spiral earrings

A few pictures from Dublin before we part:

IMG_20140802_135221527 National Museum

 

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The Brazen Head-Ireland’s oldest pub-it came highly recommended  and did not disappoint!

 

IMG_20140803_114031631_HDRPeople watching…

IMG_20140801_165432244Temple Bar district on a bank holiday weekend- it is rather quiet during the daytime hours.

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Until next time-Cheers!

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Trippen

labrynth garnet earrings detail Chartres Labyrinth earrings, photo by Marcy Merrill

It seems somehow appropriate to start this  post with an image of recently completed earrings. They represent the sum of my explorations into etching and using Japanese patina on shibuichi alloy-and the image of the Labyrinth, which is etched on the metal surface, is highly symbolic of my own creative quest.

Long used in spiritual rituals world wide, labyrinths can be walked or danced, representing an initiation-a transformative, mysterious and universal awakening into a “universe larger than our inspirations, richer and more complex than all our dreams-it is the call of the larger cycle, the dance of the larger life.”-Helen Curry

labyrinth eaaling st marys

The long anticipated journey to Ireland and England begins this week! I am beyond excited at the thought of exploring Dublin, taking a week long workshop in Celtic Chasing with Brian Clarke, and meeting my sea glass friend Jane  in Newcastle, England. The timing for hunting sea glass couldn’t be better, as it coincides with a Super full moon on August 9th (this wasn’t intentionally planned by me-or was it?!)

I will be taking an assortment of sea glass jewelry with the plan to shoot it on the beaches in England where the glass was found. To see some stunning photography of these beaches, check out the link of photographer Ray Etchells.

Here are some shots of recent work  taken by my dear friend Marcy Merrill in her North Cove Washington studio:

sea candy collection 2 Sea Candy rings in rare shades of Victorian era sea glass with reticulated silver, 22kt gold and small diamonds.

sea candy blue 2sa

bee coin ring ancient Greek coin with honey bee, circa 350 B.C.

labrinyth earring turqs

Labyrinth shield earrings-etched shibuichi with 22kt gold rivets and turquoise.

And…here are two shots from Spring and Summer2014 as featured by Kucoon Designs, Los Angeles:

!cid_C9027FF2-5E8C-4DC6-B7A0-1B4686DD048E@socal_rrCrusader Cuffs-etched copper with sea glass and moonstones, photo by Daniel Jung

kucoon burning man

If you would like to see photos of my adventures, check out my facebook page for updates when on the road-unless that is, I decide to unplug until my return!

In the Good Old Summertime

gothtini

Summer began with a family visit that is still partially going on…this post will be brief in words ( I think) but hopefully show through photos that which has been keeping me so busy that I haven’t had time to share much via my blog recently. In the last post I was preparing for my Los Angleles based family to arrive for an extended stay. My brother Joey, his girlfriend Amy Jo and her 13 year old son, Jaydon made the trek to the great Northwest by car with our 85 year old father as their precious cargo. Joey likened the 1200 mile  trip as a cross between the films The Long Long Trailer and The Grapes of Wrath…

wrath

Arriving safely, we began a very pleasant round of  barbequed meals, beach walks, playing guitars, campfires,  movie watching,  and two visits to Astoria and Cannon Beach, Oregon. And yes, summer rain just for the Angelenos!

astoria rain ecola beach 2 Ecola Beach, Oregon

On our small island in Tokeland, Joey found an old bottle with cork intact. In raised lettering on the front side of the bottle is the inscription:  “Dr. Price’s Delicious Flavoring Extracts”.

dr price bottle

After some internet-searching, we discovered that Dr. Price was the inventor of baking powder. He patented a line of flavoring extracts at the turn of the century (1910-1915). There were flavors like cherry, vanilla, orange etc. We also learned that Dr. Price was the grandfather of the actor Vincent Price. As with most beach finds, there is no clear answer as to how that bottle ended up in such pristine condition on our beach-where had it been all these years? Is the caramel colored liquid inside it the remains of an original delicious flavoring? We decided to leave it corked-for now….

vincent p(Vincent Price)

 

During this time I continued to work a few hours every day in the studio, preparing for two trunk shows in the same week. My good friend Jeffro modified some beach-salvaged wood stumps to create workstations for metal smithing. I can work comfortably at standing, sitting or kneeling positions. As I am preparing for my Celtic Chasing class in Ireland in August, this is perfect for having a good place to practice before the workshop begins.

work stations 2 workstaions3

Before the trunk shows I wanted to get some photos of just finished pieces. Amy Jo was an inspiring model/ collaborator for the shoot…

Summer Solstice Photos

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131solsctice earrings

blue set

sky cuff

moonstone necklace amy

I am going to close this with one family photo and the promise to keep in touch as the summer progresses. I hope that  you have some time to reconnect with those that bring you joy, some time for solitude, and plenty of adventures!

summer bbq

Seeds of Summer

 

1956 The Bad Seed McCormack The Bad Seed 1956-there is a tie in to this teaser photo-just keep reading…

 

The past month has been one of seasonal (and personal ) transition. As the days are getting longer and warmer we prepare  for the setting in motion of ideas, goals and long held dreams…

To start with the most literal: This week the kids and I  planted our vegetable  garden. This always take longer than expected-weeding and digging, waiting out the rainy weeks and digging some more.

garden 2014Sophia (my very own Bad Seed) and Bud, planting a row of sweet peas in a small corner of the garden plot

This year we have expanded the size of the garden area because my dad is coming up from Southern California to spend the summer with us. He is 85 years old, in good health and has loved gardening his whole life. The big plan is for him to relocate permanently nearby-and the garden is one of ways we are hoping to entice him to stay beyond September. My theory: If an older person has more family interaction and social stimulation their aging process may be reversed to some degree. He still has a lot to contribute and has said he will probably live for another 15 years. So let’s keep him busy and off the streets!

Other exciting news: I have bought my plane tickets and am traveling to Ireland and England for two weeks in August. In Ireland I will be taking a workshop with renowned silversmith Brian Clarke. The class is called Celtic Chasing. Chasing is an ancient technique used to achieve a dimensional or sculptural relief on the surface of metal. I can only imagine how this will expand the direction of my jewelry…

banner9example of Celtic chasing by Brian Clarke

Following the workshop I will travel to the NE coast of England to visit with my sea glass friend Jane and her family. This is going to be a dream come true-to hang with some cool English folk and actually get to set foot on some of the beaches where the sea glass is found! (Not to mention being taken to the Workingman’s club) I plan to drink some Newcastle Brown Ale in Newcastle  and hopefully find a few treasures on the beach to take home with me. And of course, gather memories that will last forever!

ne coast of england Jane’s beach (which shall be nameless)

The photo below shows some larger size sea glass specimens from the NE coast of England. These are pieces I have bought and kept just to look at…there is also a fossilized clam from our area in the group.

sea glass and clam

And here are some recent jewelry pieces made with English sea glass:

 

sea glass stopper ring

Bottle stopper fragment set in ancient style ring band-photo by Marcy Merrill

green sea glass ring marcyprong set seaglass marcyProng set sea glass with etched copper and silver-photo by Marcy Merrill

Meanwhile back at the ranch…

jaws marquis

There is a much loved and recently renovated theater (vintage 1929) in the city of Hoquiam. (about 35 miles from where we live.)  It plays classic films and hosts live performances on occasion. I never miss a chance to take my kids and their friends to see films like The Bad Seed, (as pictured at header) Them, The Wizard of Oz, The Planet of the Apes, Psycho, La Cage Aux Folles (with live drag show!) and The Sound of Music. Last weekend we saw JAWS on the big screen. I remember standing in line to see this movie when it was first released in the summer of 1975. How fun to revisit it again on the big screen with my own kids-a rite of passage as summer (and swimming) approach!

jaws selfieL-R Leah (good friend) my son Raleigh and me…

Only a few weeks left of school for the kids-as for me-I am working daily in the studio and enjoying this last bit of solitude.

 

faceted marble ring marcy Something new: ancient style ring design with faceted cat’s eye marble-Marcy Merrill photo

In Closing….

spring sunset

As  family visits and international travel loom, I promise to keep you updated on all of the above-it should be an interesting summer. I hope you have some great adventures planned as well (and that they do not include winning a penmanship medal!)

Five Minutes

ultra violet ring chryspprase earrings

Spring has definitely arrived on the NW coast, and with it, our annual Tokeland Studio Tour. This year it is Saturday April 19th from 10:00-5:00 PM. There will be three art studios open including my friend Jeffro, Knock on Wood. A variety of area artist showing in the lobby of the historic Tokeland Hotel, and the Shoalwater Bay Tribe will have a display of work from their apprentice carvers program.

The Daily Astorian recently published an interview with me about my work, inspriation, and processes-if you care to take a look, click on the link….

http://www.coastweekend.com/arts/five-minutes-with-judith-altruda/article_02985d70-bac5-11e3-b73c-001a4bcf887a.html

Will close this post with a sampling of recent pieces to be debuted at the tour this weekend.

HAPPY SPRING!!!

salt water blue diamond

amazonite shi earringsstarburst earrings shi cuff

mer maid rocks

flame two

 

Patina Envy

 

220px-Hancoin1large

This winter I have been on a quest for patina. Patina is a tarnish that forms on metals such as copper, bronze or other like alloys after exposure to oxygen, rain, salt and other natural elements over a long period of time. It causes iron to rust and sometimes produces shades of green coloring in copper.

My goal was to coax  color development in metal  that is evocative of timeworn surfaces. To produce a texture and finish that works in harmony with the design  of my jewelry. Easier said than done…

 

Several years ago, I bought a book about Japanese patina methods. I made some attempts to patina shibuichi-an alloy of copper and silver that was once used for Samurai sword decoration. The results were pretty uninteresting. Maybe I didn’t have enough patience or time to invest in experimentation. (ya think?) Perhaps I was expecting to get results in a hurry (no comment.) In any case, I packed up the supplies and equipment and put it away for another time…

spanish door  door key hole

Inspirational (and metaphorical) examples of patina, doors and keyholes…..

Japanese patina trials part two:

This winter I brought out the box of supplies, re read the book Japanese Patinas by Eitoku Sugimori and decided to give it another go. This time with full surrender to the experimental process and all the mystery that accompanies it. This time with patience.

Before you can try out any of the recipes you must have a copper pot. Any other metal with interact with the chemicals used for patina. A glass pot would be an okay substitute, but the copper imparts something extra  to the coloring process.

Finding an all copper pot isn’t as easy as one might think. After scouring the internet  (they were either very expensive or lined in tin,) I mentioned the search to my sister. She was getting ready to take a load of stuff to the Goodwill-including our grandmother’s fondue set, which was all copper. Perfect timing!

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Once word got out that I was on the lookout for a copper pot, two other friends donated to the cause. Now I have three pots in handy sizes. The photo shows them after patina usage, with chemical residue building up inside. This residue strengthens the next batch of patina-it it sort of like seasoning a pan. FYI: the name patina is derived from the Latin for “shallow dish.”

 

Sakurajima_daikon

After ordering copper sulfate and rokuso (a Japanese chemical used in some of the recipes) I had to get some daikon radish. This is part of the traditional process. It is grated and applied to the clean metal just prior to immersion in the patina bath.

Of course, before this can happen, the jewelry piece must be in a near finished state. All forming and soldering completed. There is no going back after the patina bath-except to start the process all over again. If using stones, the setting of these takes place after the patina, being very careful not to mar the surface. The cuff in the patina bath below has been etched (see my January2014 post to learn about that process) formed, had rivets applied and bezels for stones soldered in place.

006  witches brew

This cuff is made from shibuichi consisting of mostly copper alloyed with silver.It can be purchased with amounts of silver content ranging from 25%, 15% or 5%. I decided to try all three and take careful notes on the differences. I am not going to transcribe my notes here-but rather show with photos the alchemical journey…I was trying out a layered patina.This is a multi step process. First, a foundation layer of patina is applied by immersing the object into near boiling Niage solution. This can create colors ranging from straw to silver grey to browns. It depends on the metal content and a lot of variables. I had no idea how much time it might take, it doesn’t specify in the book. When I decided the color was not changing any more, I removed it from the pan and rinsed.

The second part of the process involves fuming the piece. A mixture of ammonia, salt and vinegar can be used, brushing it on the piece and enclosing in a glass jar

 

011

This produces a blue green color in crevices and craggy spots.

Athena-Goddess of Patina

The above piece changed a lot during this part of the experiment. I went from loving it to hating it. From bliss to despair. Deciding there was nothing to lose, I rinsed it, burned off the surface color and started over. It is still in a fuming jar as I write this. At about this time I realized that there must be a god of patina. And I needed to make a request before trying again. To ask for a little guidance and oversight (or insight!) My searches brought me back to Athena-Goddess of arts, craft, wisdom, war and metal. The rest is between me and her…

Some of the first pieces:

textile cuff wide 2   textile cuff wide

This cuff is shibuichi with  etched Japanese textile pattern, silver rivets and amazonite set in 18kt gold. It is 3 inches wide. It has a coat of wax rubbed into the surface to protect the patina and finish.

shi cuff narrow  shi raindrop cuff 2

These two are also shibuichi, variations on a theme..the one on the left has 22kt gold rivets and a diamond in the center. It is one inch wide. The one on the right has 22kt gold rivets, and a piece of Victorian era sea glass set in 22kt gold. It is two inches wide.

shi sheild earrings aventurine  tidepool dia ring

The earrings are shi as well, but a higher silver content, They were more challenging to patina, but I like the way they came out, like little shields. The ring is etched bronze with sea glass and a diamond. In the same patina bath,the bronze turned a milk chocolate brown-pretty with the blue green sea glass.

I feel that the above group was successful in that they are consistent color-wise-and now I have something to build on. Stay tuned for more as I continue to experiment and develop a color vocabulary…

I will conclude this by saying that every part of the jewelry making process is pretty much about control and technique. Until we get to patina. This is unpredictable territory filed with variables. It is a mysterious and intuitive process. It is a collaboration of science and art. It is magic, pure and simple.

textile cuff wide . inside curljpg  sunset last 2 21

RAIN

rain

Compared to the rest of the USA or other countries, our winter weather has been mild and easy. But there has been an unduly amount of rain, even for us..fortunately my favorite escape from endless grey is to lose myself in the studio. It’s better than a trip to Hawaii-even though I am sure Sadie Thompson might disagree with me on that!

There have been some bright spots to start the new year. Jeffro made an incredible display bench for my studio. He salvaged the maple top from the beach in front of my house. The support pieces are from a ship wreck on nearby Washaway Beach.

jeffro display bench    Judith 17http://www.jeffrouitto.com/

I can’t even express how much I love it-made by a good friend and truly one of a kind.

Another friend, photo journalist Erika Langley, stopped by the weekend this bench was delivered. It also happened to be Super bowl Sunday. In Washington state this was a HUGE deal. (BTW: The Seattle Seahawks won.) Erika and I took advantage of the completely empty beach-not even any footprints in the sand- to take some artist shots.

me  Judith 16

photos by Erika Langley

Without realizing it, she took a series of shots that formed a narrative of place- the source of artist inspiration, the artist at work and finished jewelry pieces.

Since I dislike having my picture taken, (unless there is wine and a fedora involved) I was trying to relax and forget about the camera. Erika made that easy. I have recently had another birthday and am now in my mid fifties. Okay I said it! Recently I have been giving thought to the aging process. There have not been a lot of widely publicized role models or mentors for women until recently for this time in life. I have decided to embrace it. Be nicer to myself. Enjoy  the little and the big things. Ditch the rules. Dream big.

On that note, I now must share a few pictures of my pet project. The restoration of my 1971 Volkswagen Karmann Ghia.

I bought this car four years ago from a local fisherman. It was barely running and pretty much in shreds. My ex husband, Tom, got it into running order and did a lot of interior restoration. After saving up money and a  search to find the right body and paint man, the project started in January 2014. With any luck at all it should be drive- able by June.

ghis restortation 1743470_526872930759532_43213501_n

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This is the color it is going to be-it’s called Seaside. The job is being done by Three Crows Garage in nearby Westport, WA.

Back to the studio…

Here are some action shots from our Superbowl Sunday Shoot:

Judith 21   Judith 31

And a piece of finished work. These are wedding rings for  Rachel and Nick of Portland Oregon. They will be getting married on the summer solstice 2014. Their rings feature Victorian era sea glass from the coast of England set in 22KT gold with reticulated silver bands.

Judith 48 photo by Erika Langley

And now for some shots of recent pieces:

blue lagoon ring 029 031 large008 photos by Judith

All of these feature English sea glass. Did I mention that I have recently renewed my passport? I am hoping to take a trip to the NE coast of England in later summer to visit the beaches where this sea glass is found. One of the people I buy it from has very kindly invited me to visit her and her family. (and also the working man’s club!) I am a firm believer in planting seeds for whatever you want to manifest. So taking the action to get the passport renewed was step one.

Judith 43

 photo by Erika Langley   http://www.erikalangley.com/

Hope this scattered sharing of some of the past month’s highlights has been of interest and not too rambling…Until next time, I remind you that even though it is still winter for another six weeks or so, it’s time to plant the seeds for whatever you want to manifest your life.

In the immortal ad copy of Fredericks of Hollywood (and the Rocky Horror Picture Show):

Don’t dream it-be it.”